Call for Abstract

World Cardiology Meeting, will be organized around the theme “Explore the Science Behind Heart”

Cardiologist Meet 2019 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Cardiologist Meet 2019

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks.

Register now for the conference by choosing an appropriate package suitable to you.

Heart failure, sometimes known as congestive heart failure, occurs when your heart muscle doesn't pump blood as well as it should. Certain conditions, such as narrowed arteries in your heart (coronary artery disease) or high blood pressure, gradually leave your heart too weak or stiff to fill and pump efficiently. Not all conditions that lead to heart failure can be reversed, but treatments can improve the signs and symptoms of heart failure and help you live longer. Lifestyle changes — such as exercising, reducing sodium in your diet, managing stress and losing weight — can improve your quality of life.

  • Faulty heart valves
  • Damage to the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy)
  • Myocarditis and Abnormal heart rhythms
  • Life-threatening heart and lung conditions

Cardiovascular Pharmacology deals with the study of the effect of drugs upon the heart or the circulatory system. Cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of hospitalizations and death in the whole world. Developing new therapeutic agents for cardiovascular diseases has always been the priority for the pharmaceutical industry because of the huge potential market for these drugs. Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics will focus primarily on drugs used in the treatment of cardiovascular disease, both current drug classes and those in development. It mainly contributes to the safety profile of potential new drugs and provides pharmacological data that can be used for optimization of further compounds and the ultimate selection of compounds suitable for clinical development.

  • Drug-Induced Cardiac Toxicity
  • Novel Anti-Inflammatory Therapies for Atherosclerosis
  • Development of Novel Anti-Ischemic Agents
  • Beta Blockers Blocking
  • Cardiac Glycoside

Cardiothoracic surgery (also known as thoracic surgery) is the field of medicine involved in surgical treatment of organs inside the thorax (the chest)—generally treatment of conditions of the heart (heart disease) and lungs (lung disease). In most countries, cardiac surgery (involving the heart and the great vessels) and general thoracic surgery are separate surgical specialties.

Cardiac rehabilitation, also called cardiac rehab, is a customized outpatient program of exercise and education. Cardiac rehabilitation is designed to help you improve your health and help you recover from a heart attack, other forms of heart disease or surgery to treat heart disease. That often involves exercise training, emotional support and education about lifestyle changes to reduce your heart disease risk, such as eating a heart-healthy diet, keeping a healthy weight and quitting smoking.

  • Complementary alternative medical therapies
  • Loss of proteins and interstitial edema
  • Preoperative guided imagery training
  • Transmission of viral and immunological diseases

Hypertension (HTN or HT), also known as high blood pressure (HBP), is a long-term medical condition in which the blood pressure in the arteries is persistently elevated. High blood pressure typically does not cause symptoms. Long-term high blood pressure, however, is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, peripheral vascular disease, vision loss, chronic kidney disease, and dementia.

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a type of kidney disease in which there is gradual loss of kidney function over a period of months or years. Early on there are typically no symptoms. Later, leg swelling, feeling tired, vomiting, loss of appetite or confusion may develop. Complications may include heart disease, high blood pressure, bone disease or anemia.

  • Microalbuminuria
  • Reduction in the glomerular filtration rate
  • The presence of albuminuria
  • Reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality
  • High intraglomerular pressure

Track 5: Inflammatory Heart Diseases

The inflammation of the heart muscles, such as myocarditis, the membrane sac which surrounds the heart called as pericarditis, and the inner lining of the heart or the myocardium, heart muscle as endocarditis are known as the inflammatory heart diseases. Inflammation of heart is caused by known infectious agents, viruses, bacteria, fungi or parasites and by toxic materials from the environment, water, food, air, toxic gases, smoke and pollution, or by an unknown origin. Myocarditis is induced by infection of heart muscle by virus like sarcoidosis and immune diseases. The symptoms include chest pain, angina, pain in heart muscle, and shortness of breath, edema, swelling of feet or ankles, and fatigue.

  • Implantable cardiac defibrillator
  • Intravenous immunoglobulin
  • Beta blockers and diuretics
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy or cardiac arrest

Track 6: Pediatric Cardiology

Helen B. Taussig is known as the founder of pediatric cardiology. She became famous through her work with Tetralogy of Fallot, a congenital heart defect in which oxygenated and deoxygenated blood enters the circulatory system resulting from a ventricular septal defect (VSD) right beneath the aorta. This condition causes newborns to have a bluish-tint, cyanosis, and have a deficiency of oxygen to their tissues, hypoxemia. She worked with Alfred Blalock and Vivien Thomas at the Johns Hopkins Hospital where they experimented with dogs to look at how they would attempt to surgically cure these "blue babies." They eventually figured out how to do just that by the anastomosis of the systemic artery to the pulmonary artery and called this the Blalock-Taussig Shunt.

  • Cardiac Malformation
  • Congenital Abnormalities
  • Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndromes
  • Auditory Stimulation Therapy
  • Myocarditis

Track 7: Coronary Artery Disease

Coronary artery disease (CAD), also known as ischemic heart disease (IHD), involves the reduction of blood flow to the heart muscle due to buildup of plaque in the arteries of the heart. It is the most common of the cardiovascular diseases. Types include stable angina, unstable angina, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. A common symptom is chest pain or discomfort which may travel into the shoulder, arm, back, neck, or jaw. Occasionally it may feel like heartburn. Usually symptoms occur with exercise or emotional stress, last less than a few minutes, and improve with rest. Shortness of breath may also occur and sometimes no symptoms are present. In many cases, the first sign is a heart attack. Other complications include heart failure or an abnormal heartbeat.

  • Percutaneous coronary intervention
  • Coronary artery bypass surgery
  • Atherosclerotic vascular disease
  • Coronary computed tomographic angiography
  • Coronary angiogram

Track 8: Diabetes, Obesity & Stroke

Obesity increases the risk for heart disease and stroke. But it harms more than just the heart diagnosis and blood vessel system. It's also a major cause of gallstones, osteoarthritis and respiratory problems. In addition to weight gain is a frequent consequence of heart damaging lifestyle choices such as lack of exercise & a fat laden diet. Obesity also can lead to serious conditions like heart failure, in which your heart can’t pump enough blood to the body. Having diabetes or pre-diabetes puts one at increased risk for heart disease and stroke. One can lower its risk by keeping the blood glucose (also called blood sugar), hypertension, and blood cholesterol close to the recommended target numbers the levels suggested by diabetes experts for good health. Stroke and coronary heart disease can be caused by the same problem atherosclerosis.

  • Diabetes Mellitus and Stroke
  • Abdominal Obesity
  • Vascular dementia
  • Abnormal cholesterol and high triglycerides
  • Hemorrhagic Strokes (Bleeds)
  • Metabolic syndrome

Track 9: Cardiac Regeneration and Remodeling

Regeneration in humans is the regrowth of lost tissues or organs in response to injury. This is in contrast to wound healing, which involves closing up the injury site with a scar. Some tissues such as skin and large organs including the liver regrow quite readily, while others have been thought to have little or no capacity for regeneration. However ongoing research, particularly in the heart and lungs, suggests that there is hope for a variety of tissues and organs to eventually become regeneration-capable.

In cardiology, ventricular remodeling (or cardiac remodeling) refers to changes in the size, shape, structure and function of the heart. Chronic hypertension, congenital heart disease with intracardiac shunting, and valvular heart disease may also lead to remodeling. After the insult occurs, a series of histopathological and structural changes occur in the left ventricular myocardium that lead to progressive decline in left ventricular performance. Ultimately, ventricular remodeling may result in diminished contractile (systolic) function and reduced stroke volume.

  • Renovation of existing tissues
  • Left ventricular hypertrophy
  • Vascular remodeling
  • Massive necrosis

Track 10: Pre-and Postoperative Clinical Study

Clinical study is a branch of the medical specialty of cardiology and is concerned with the study and treatment of rhythm disorders of the heart. Cardiologists with expertise in this area are usually referred to as electrophysiologists. Electrophysiologists are trained in the mechanism, function and performance of the electrical activities of the heart. Electrophysiologists work closely with other cardiologists and cardiac surgeons to assist or guide therapy for heart rhythm disturbances (arrhythmias). They are trained to perform interventional and surgical procedures to treat cardiac arrhythmia.

  • Rehabilitation Reduces Complications
  • Pneumonia with antibiotic treatment
  • Occurrence of pleural effusion
  • Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation

Effective nursing interventions are determined by the nursing diagnoses and associated etiologies. The diagnoses are derived from a complete data base that results from a thorough assessment. As the nurse proceeds through the process of differentiating among diagnoses, the focused cue search is essential. For the client with PVD, lifestyle changes, symptomatology, chronicity of the disease, and frequent contact with the health care system are the major influences on the diagnoses. These clients are likely to have potential for injury, potential for infection, impaired skin integrity, activity intolerance, alteration in tissue perfusion, alteration in comfort, and knowledge deficit. Other diagnoses are probable but are determined by the unique characteristics of each client.

  • Impaired skin integrity
  • Alteration in tissue perfusion
  • Effective nursing interventions
  • Nursing Assessment

Track 12: Cardio Oncology and Chemotherapy Agents

Cardio-oncology is a rapidly growing field aimed at minimizing the effects of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in cancer survivors. To meet this aim, patients are assessed at baseline to define their risk of cardiotoxicity and then followed closely during and after chemotherapy to assess for early signs or symptoms of cardiovascular disease. Cardiac imaging and transthoracic echocardiography plays an essential role in the baseline assessment and serial follow-up of cardio-oncology patients. The objectives of this paper are to review the mechanisms of cardiotoxicity of several common chemotherapeutic agents associated with an increased risk for left ventricular systolic dysfunction and to outline recommendations regarding the baseline assessment and serial follow-up of cardio-oncology patients with a focus on the role of echocardiography.

  • Transthoracic echocardiograph
  • Cardiotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents
  • Echocardiography

Track 13: Cardiovascular Pathology Research

That involves the reduction of blood flow to the heart muscle due to buildup of plaque in the arteries of the heart. It is the most common of the cardiovascular diseases. Types include stable angina, unstable angina, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. A common symptom is chest pain or discomfort which may travel into the shoulder, arm, back, neck, or jaw. Occasionally it may feel like heartburn. Usually symptoms occur with exercise or emotional stress, last less than a few minutes, and improve with rest. Shortness of breath may also occur and sometimes no symptoms are present. In many cases, the first sign is a heart attack. Other complications include heart failure or an abnormal heartbeat.

  • Gene-environment interactions
  • Mechanisms of cardiotoxicity
  • Genetic epidemiology

Track 14: Open Heart Surgery and Depression

Open-heart surgery is any kind of surgery in which a surgeon makes a large incision (cut) in the chest to open the rib cage and operate on the heart. "Open" refers to the chest, not the heart. Depending on the type of surgery, the surgeon also may open the heart.

Depression, a state of low mood and aversion to activity, can affect a person's thoughts, behavior, tendencies, feelings, and sense of well-being.

  • Percutaneous coronary intervention
  • Coronary artery bypass surgery
  • Atherosclerotic vascular disease
  • Coronary computed tomographic angiography
  • Coronary angiogram

Track 15: Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT

Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) is a non-profit professional association devoted to the study of nuclear cardiology and cardiovascular computed tomography, which are subsets of nuclear medicine. With more than 4,500 members worldwide, ASNC is the international leader in education, advocacy, and quality in cardiovascular imaging. ASNC's mission is to provide professional education, establish standards and guidelines for practice and training, and serve as a representative in health policy forums for individuals in the nuclear cardiology field.

Computed tomography, commonly known as a CT scan, combines multiple X-ray images with the aid of a computer to produce cross-sectional views of the body. Cardiac CT is a heart-imaging test that uses CT technology with or without intravenous (IV) contrast (dye) to visualize the heart anatomy, coronary circulation, and great vessels (which includes the aorta, pulmonary veins, and arteries).

  • Percutaneous coronary intervention
  • Coronary artery bypass surgery
  • Atherosclerotic vascular disease
  • Coronary computed tomographic angiography
  • Coronary angiogram

Genetic factors influence the development of cardiovascular disease in men who are less than 55 years-old and in women who are less than 65 years old. Cardiovascular disease in a person's parents increases their risk by 3-fold. Multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) have been found to be associated with cardiovascular disease in genetic association studies but usually their individual influence is small, and genetic contributions to cardiovascular disease are poorly understood.

  • Gene-environment interactions
  • Mechanisms of cardiotoxicity
  • Genetic epidemiology

 

Interventional cardiology and electrophysiology is a branch of cardiology that deals specifically with the catheter-based treatment of structural heart diseases. The radial artery may also be used for cannulation; this approach offers several advantages, including the accessibility of the artery in most patients, the easy control of bleeding even in anticoagulated patients, the enhancement of comfort because patients are capable of sitting up and walking immediately following the procedure, and the near absence of clinically significant sequelae in patients with a normal Allen test.

  • Microangiography
  • Percutaneous valve replacement
  • Neuro-Vascular Angiography
  • Catheter & Stent

 

A case report is generally considered a type of anecdotal evidence. Nevertheless, case reports do have genuinely useful roles in medical research and evidence-based medicine. They have facilitated recognition of new diseases and adverse effects of treatments (e.g., recognition of the link between administration of thalidomide to mothers and malformations in their babies was triggered by a case report. Case reports have a role in pharmacovigilance. They can also help understand the clinical spectrum of rare diseases as well as unusual presentations of common diseases. They can help generate study hypotheses, including plausible mechanisms of disease. Case reports may also have a role to play in guiding the personalization of treatments in clinical practice.

  • Aortic Diseases
  • Infective Endocarditis
  • Disorders due to Coronary Circulation
  • Myocardium and Pericardium
  • How to Counter Coronary Artery Disease